February First Friday Review

Vincent Meyers

The year’s first well-attended First Friday saw a round of new work presented across the several participating sites. Two were of note. Lubbock’s artists and gallerists usually face narrow, sometimes compromising constraints in their spaces, but these exhibitions distinguished themselves both for their quality and for the beautiful integration of their creators’ visions with the spaces they occupied. In the TTU Satellite Gallery, a project of Texas Tech MFA candidates Ashley Busby, Alberto Careaga, and Kristen Swartz, Bedtime Stories: A Collective Reimagining, brought together a spatial assemblage of childhood memory, objet, and physical metaphor in an interaction of the artists and projected images of them asleep. The result was a tilt-shift focused, emotionally intimate mind-scape depicting the interplay of people’s subconscious and dream-conscious. The second, the Texas Tech Student component of the 2015 Texas Sculpture Symposium saw around 30 of the TTU sculpture department’s works on display in the barest of industrial warehouses adjacent the LHUCA. The works ranged from da Vinci-esque mechanical kinetic sculptures to a slant-mounted door beckoning viewers to revolve around its position in the center of a room. Each piece was given space such that it could converse with the viewer uninterrupted and light such that its presence was spoken and not shouted. Both exhibitions articulated to its viewer what every exhibition should: this is art and you should think about it. I quite hope they keep it coming.


Stay tuned for our February FFAT Review of TTU Students' Group Show: col.lab.o.rate


Images/Video:

Bedtime Stories: A Collective Reimagining

Alberto Careaga and Harrison Brooks, “Not An Exit”, Collaborative Site-Specific Installation

Pedram Baldari and Alberto Careaga, "Stuttering Space", Collaborative Site-Specific Installation

Bedtime Stories: A Collective Reimagining

Courtesy of Kristen Swartz and Alberto Careaga

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